American Bresse Chickens

Welcome! American Bresse chickens are a remarkable, dual-purpose breed!

Group of American Bresse hens with the flock rooster foraging amongst kitchen scraps at Ambresse Acres. These are patriot birds: Red comb, white feathers, blue legs!


The breed is quite new to the United States and Canada, having been imported only in 2011. 

If you’re hearing about this breed for the very first time, perhaps that is why.


It is hard to keep secret a breed this cool and useful!

American Bresse chickens are excellent egg-layers. They are likely to start laying eggs by week 17, and they lay close to an egg a day through spring, summer, and autumn. Many American Bresse chickens lay 250 eggs per year, or more.

American Bresse chickens are also fast growing meat birds. They grow faster than the usual dual purpose breeds such as Rhode Island Red or Plymouth Rock.

Additionally, American Bresse have the same unique meat qualities that French Bresse chickens have. They are described as the "most delicious chicken in France" due to the fat-marbled meat sought after by renowned chefs. And they command a commensurate price in French markets.

They are lookers, too!

American Bresse chickens are a striking red, white and blue. 

Roosters have large, shockingly red single combs and wattles contrasting sharply with their all-white feathers. The legs provide the blue, ranging in color from quite bluish to a darker steel gray.

Those first French chicken farmers may have been quite patriotic. Whether by accident or by design, Bresse chicken coloration is now proudly said to represent the blue, white, and red of the French flag.

Interesting for American Bresse breeders is that the United States flag is, very conveniently, also red, white and blue.

While American Bresse are most commonly found in all-white plumage, nevertheless blue, black, grey (silver penciled), and splash varieties also exist. All have blue to steel-gray legs. 


American Bresse Chickens are Still Being Perfected...

And breeders are up for the challenge.

Surely it is evident that the French were not going to just sell to anyone their very best Bresse stock?

Ten years is the longest any breeders in the United States have been specifically breeding American Bresse. That is why great opportunity exists to further improve this breed, and Ambresse.com is here to help, as much as possible.


Ambresse.com is here to help...

  • Are you already raising American Bresse chickens?
  • Are you intrigued about learning more about this breed?
  • Do you own or raise another breed or breeds of chickens?
  • Do you totally enjoy a breakfast omelet or gourmet chicken dinner?

If you answered YES! to any of the above, welcome, and keep reading!

And feel free to click on the links that interest you.

Have questions? Drop us a line and let us know how we can help.

Ambresse.com supports American Bresse Breeders, Hobby Farmers, and Homesteaders...

  • Ambresse.com presents the history and background of the French Bresse Chicken, the source of the American Bresse chicken. This is so we’ll have a sense of where the breed has been, and where it is going. We hope you will join us on the journey!

  • Ambresse.com will support a nascent American Bresse Breed Club, which as of mid-2021 is not yet fully organized. But soon!

    Because the breed is relatively new in North America, it needs breeders willing to dedicate themselves to improving the breed to French standards...or to an American standard once one is written.

    The Breed Club will eventually create a working standard of perfection for the American Bresse breed that will help guide American and Canadian breeding choices. With concerted and joint efforts, the breed will thrive here in America.

    Feel free to bookmark this website and check back here as frequently as you like! We’ll direct you to the club details as soon as they become available.
  • It will provide guidance on best practices for selective breeding. I love that the American Bresse breed already benefits humanity in multiple ways, but there is always room for improvement, for example, to improve body structure or growth efficiency, or to eliminate genetic problems as they crop up.

  • It will maintain an American Bresse breeder directory, for at least as long as needed. The breed is new in North America - by working together we can continue the journey toward enhancing and perfecting the American Bresse breed on this side of the Atlantic. 

  • It will offer a marketplace to American Bresse breeders. They will have opportunity to list American Bresse related items that they might have available, such as eggs, hatching eggs, breeding stock, meat, even manure, etc.

  • It will detail husbandry practices that are partially or mostly specific to the American Bresse breed. For example, an American Bresse market bird will become an excellent market bird after a degree of "finishing" is applied. We'll give you the full scoop on how to produce a meat bird that will satisfy the finest chef. But of course, how much finishing you wish to do is completely up to you.

Ambresse.com will be useful to chicken owners generally...

  • Ambresse.com will include helpful general information on raising chickens, caring for chicks, etc. While this website is mainly focused on American Bresse chickens, in all actuality a chicken is a chicken. You'll find good resources here no matter what breed of chicken you own or raise.

  • All chicken owners and breeders need various useful tools and supplies. Whether you raise American Bresse chickens or other breeds, we will include ideas about and links to info on chicken coops, housing, feeding, and much more.

Ambresse.com will be a gold mine of info for connoisseurs, gourmet cooks, and homemakers...

  • Ambresse.com will have a chicken recipe section! There are some fabulous recipes that are exceptional when prepared using an American Bresse chicken.

    And additionally, it is always fun to try out others' favorite recipes! Do you have an absolutely lovely chicken recipe? We'll make it easy for you to share it here on this Ambresse website.

  • It will discuss nutritional information about eggs, chicken meat, chicken stock, bone broth, and more, for those who need the information. It's always great to be aware of nutritional values, especially if you have any dietary concerns.

  • It will give how-to instructions for making and preserving products derived from American Bresse chickens, for example, water glassing or dehydrating eggs... making, canning, and dehydrating bone broth... making and preserving chicken stock... and more

    From overages of eggs to overages of meat, we'll give you all our favorite ways to preserve your cornucopia of bounty so you'll have more than enough and to spare through the leaner winter months.

    Setting aside for a rainy day gives joy and comfort, and if you have enough bounty to give away to someone less fortunate, Providence smiles.

American Bresse chickens come from France

American Bresse chickens originated directly from French Bresse chickens in the Bresse province of France (pictured), which have been raised by the French people for at least 500 years, and no doubt quite a bit longer.

The year 1591 marks the first known recognition in the historical record of "Bresse" chickens. 

American Bresse

The first French Bresse chicken imports arrived in the United States in 2011. Legal controls around the use of the name "Bresse" outside of the tiny Bresse region in France necessitated modifications to the breed name in North America. Here, the breed is currently called American Bresse. They are virtually identical genetically to Bresse chickens in France.

There is much more breed history and details on the French Bresse Chicken History page.


God Bless You!